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Remembering 9/11…Man in the Red Bandanna and We Go Higher

Remembering 9/11…As the anniversary of 9/11 comes around each year, I find different ways to remember and reflect on that day in our history, the impacts to our nation, to individual people and families, the human loss, our culture and the world. This year, there are two new films documenting the human side of the 9/11 tragedy.

Man in the Red Bandanna

Man in the Red Bandanna details the life of Welles Crowther, 24, a rookie equities trader from Upper Nyack, N.Y., who died in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. He became known as the Man in the Red Bandana, for the handkerchief he wore as a protective mask while acting as a rescuer’s in the South Tower before it collapsed.

He is credited with helping at least 10 people escape the tower in several trips up and down stairwells, before perishing alongside a group of New York City firefighters.

His is one of the countless stories of heroism from that dark day, which marks its 16th anniversary on Monday. His story has been told numerous times, but it is laid out in dramatically poignant detail in a new documentary, “Man In Red Bandana,” which opens this weekend at several New York-area theaters and is also being released online.

A clip about this film can be found @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtJJViD_Hh8

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/nyregion/welles-crowther-man-in-red-bandanna-911.html

We Go Higher

Delaney Colaio was 3 years old on Sept. 11, 2001. Her father, Mark Colaio, and two uncles, Stephen Colaio and Thomas Pedicini, perished at the World Trade Center’s North Tower that  day.

Earlier this year, Ms. Colaio began working arduously on writing and directing “We Go Higher,” a documentary by and about children who lost parents on Sept. 11. “We’ve committed to filming every single 9/11 kid that wants to be filmed,” she said. So far, they’ve interviewed nearly 70 of the more than 3,000 children who lost parents in the attacks, many of whom she was able to reach through the organization Tuesday’s Children. The current participants range in age from 15 — children whose mothers were pregnant then — to 52.

The film, produced by Women Rising, is expected to premiere in 2018.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/nyregion/new-york-today-the-children-of-9-11-delaney-colaio.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

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